From Anita Hill’s allegations in the 1990s to the recent flood of allegations in the news headlines, sexual harassment has been a persistent and pervasive problem. It occurs at all levels, across all occupations. While many companies have policies addressing inappropriate and unwelcome sexual behavior in the workplace, those policies may not be enough. Continue Reading Tips on How to Proactively Address Workplace Harassment

Technological advances are leading many businesses to collect and store the biometric data of their employees, contractors, and customers for purposes of identification and authentication. Biometric data has many uses, such as giving people access to their accounts and sensitive financial information, providing employees, contractors, and customers physical access to workplaces and businesses, and giving employees the ability to clock in and out of work without using keyfobs or ID cards. Continue Reading Illinois Businesses Beware: Class Action Suits on the Rise for Alleged Violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act

Pay Data Requirement for EEO-1 Form Stayed
Earlier this week, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) initiated an immediate stay of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s revamped Employer Information Report, or EEO-1. As discussed here, an expanded EEO-1 was issued in September 2016, and required employers to submit information on employee pay and hours by job category, in addition to demographic information. The new EEO-1 requirement was to take effect beginning with the next EEO-1 date of March 31, 2018 (changed from previous September 30 submission deadlines.) Continue Reading Important EEO-1 and I-9 Updates

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEOC) this week issued a publication addressing the rights of employees and applicants with mental health conditions under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The publication, entitled “Depression, PTSD, & Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace: Your Legal Rights,” can be found here. Continue Reading EEOC Giving More Thought to Mental Health Conditions

According to a recent survey, the number one reason employers have their tinsel in a tangle about office holiday parties is how much they cost.[1] But the cost of tinsel and treats is nothing compared to the expense of defending an employment lawsuit. The best way to keep holiday parties within budget—and a business out of the courtroom—is to follow these steps to minimize liability. Continue Reading I’m Dreaming of a Risk-Free Holiday—Tips for Reducing Holiday Party Employment Claims

On Tuesday, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas issued a decision enjoining the Department of Labor (DOL) from enforcing its new overtime rule. State of Nevada et al. v. U.S. Department of Labor et al., case number 16-cv-00731. The new rule, which was announced in May 2016 and was set to become effective on December 1, 2016, sent employers scrambling to comply with a substantial increase to the minimum salary requirements for the white collar exemptions. In his decision, the judge held that the DOL had exceeded its authority in issuing the rule. Continue Reading DOL Overtime Rule Blocked by Federal Court

Last week, the EEOC issued its final rule regarding pay data to be collected with the annual EEO-1 reports. Covered employers will now need to submit pay data sorted by job group and demographic data in their annual EEO-1 reports. The final rule was implemented with no material changes from the proposed rule first issued earlier this year, despite significant response and feedback from industry and employer groups citing concerns. For more information on the rule, see You Pay Your Employees What??? Employers Might Have to Share Hours and Pay Data in Proposed EEO-1 FormThe new EEO-1 form can be found here. Continue Reading EEOC and DOL Active Last Week: EEO-1 Pay Data Rule and Federal Contractor Paid Sick Leave Rule to Take Effect

On September 25, 2016, Governor Brown signed into law SB 1241, which imposes new restrictions on employers’ use of choice of law, choice of venue, and choice of forum provisions in agreements with California-based employees. Continue Reading New California Law Restricts Use of Choice of Law and Other Provisions in Agreements with California-Based Employees

A new Illinois law soon will render invalid non-compete agreements with most lower-level employees. Governor Rauner has signed into law the Illinois Freedom to Work Act (IFWA), 5 ILCS 140/1, et. seq., which prohibits private employers from entering into non-compete agreements with “low-wage employees,” defined as $13.00 per hour or less. The law is designed to prevent abuses of non-competes against employees who pose no real threat to their employer. The IFWA applies to non-compete agreements entered into on or after January 1, 2017, the effective date of the IFWA. Continue Reading New Illinois Law Bans Non-Competes for Low-Wage Workers